gobang

(Bird 1881, 2: 33) Games Var. goban [J < go 碁 the game go + ban 盤 board, game, poss. Chin k’i pan 棋盘 chessboard; applied in English to gomoku-narabe 五目並べ(ごもくならべ), played on the same board] A Japanese-originated board game with 256 squares (called gomoku-narabe 五目並べ in Japanese), where a player must get five pieces into a line before the opponent can do so.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

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go

Games Var. Go, Goh, I-go 囲碁(いご) [the national board game of Japan < MChin dial. version of ghyey < ghyeg (transcribed in Martin 1987: 394)] An ancient game of territorial possession for two players, mentioned by Confucius in the 5th century B.C. and spread to the U.S. and Europe, where there are go associations.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

ginkgo

Bot. Var. gingko, ginko +2 [NL < J gin-kyō 銀杏 (a rare var. reading of the usual ichō イチョウ) < gin 銀 silver + -kyō 杏 apricot (< MChin = Chin yin-hsing silver apricot)] (Cap.) a tree genus of eastern China, once thriving widely, but now plentiful only in Japan, China, and Korea and as a Western ornamental; a deciduous tree bearing edible fruit.
ginkgo nut/tree
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

fude

n. Painting. [筆(ふで) Poss. a very old loan < ancient Chin – this is one of the most disputed etymologies in Japanese linguistics (see Miller 1967: 214) – a tubular writing-brush or paintbrush, as a calligraphic tool for shodō 書道(しょどう), the way of writing] One of the fundamentals of writing (see sumi 墨) in the art of Japanese calligraphy.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

fu

n. (Gr 1876: 85) Pol. [a J. urban prefecture 府 < Chin] A department in Japan composed of several districts joined for governmental purposes, as in the urban prefecture of Kyoto (cf. ken and Chin fu, recorded in the 1899 century).
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

do

common formative element, Var. to [-, –, lit. way, path (written with the same character as and NJ michi), i.e. spiritual discipline < MChin dào 道 ‘way’, which is the source of E Tao/Dao, Taoism/Daoism; the mystical power of dào derives primarily from Lao-tzu’s Tao te ching 道德经, which begins “The way that can be set down in words is not the Way itself 道可道,非常道。”: an infusion of Taoism into Buddhism led to Zen, underpinning the spiritual philosophy of the Chinese and Japanese martial arts] An element (sometimes initial), combining with Sino-J. loanmorphs or (more rarely) NJ morphs, to form Japanese nouns with the meaning (1) ‘martial art or similar discipline’, e.g. aikido, budo, iaido, judo, kendo, kyudo, shintaido, and chadō sadō (tea ceremony, flower arrangement) – in dojo it means ‘martial arts as a whole’, as also in J dōgi (tea ceremony) (see GI); (2) ‘religious system’ (Shinto).
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

daikon

Food [ダイコン(大根) Lit., big root, prob. a “Made in Japan” Chinese compound, a calque of NJ ō-ne (< oho-ne おほね), lit. big root, a synonym of daikon] The Japanese radish, an important food, with long hard roots that are eaten raw or cooked; also called Chinese radish.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)