kirin

Myth. Var. Kirin, kyrin, kilin, kylin (< Chin) [Chin and J; J kirin 麒麟(きりん) a unicorn-like creature (and now usu. the J. name for ‘giraffe’) < Chin ch’i lin 麒麟, lit. male-female, a mythical Chinese unicorn that appeared at Confucius’ birth (for the hermaphrodite myth, cf. howo)] A mythical animal of composite form, found on Japanese pottery and art, and also the emblem of Kirin beer: kylin.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

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ki

common formative element Var. ke [ki, -ki, ki-, -ke 気 spirit, mind, heart, breath, energy < MChin ki 氣 (> present Chin qi, formerly spelled chi, ch’i vatal force)] An element combining with Sino-J loanmorphs or (more rarely) NJ morphs, to form J. nouns containing the idea of vital (esp. human) energy, e.g. as basis of a martial art (aikido, aiki-jutsu) or in reference to human health (kakke). Though not tabulated in the statistical analysis of this corpus, J ki is often found as an independent noun in English works dealing not only with martial arts but also with acupressure, acupuncture, and reflexology, where it carries the ancient Chinese medical meaning of ‘individual person’s life-force, the free flow of which within the body is believed to ensure physical and spiritual health’.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

Kannon

Buddhism Old var. Kwannon [the Goddess of Mercy, also known as Kanzeon-Bosatsu 観世音菩薩(かんぜおんぼさつ), one of the most popular of all bodhisattvas in Japan < MChin Kuan-Yin 观音 = Skt Avalokiteśvara अवलोकितेश्वर] The Japanese female form of Kuan-Yin, originally a male in the Indian representations.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

Japanese pagoda tree

Bot. [E < J. (nec. because esp. ambig.) + loose retransl. of J enju エンジュ, var. enisu (prob. ult. < en- 槐 a species of citron + -ju 树 tree < MChin, poss. according to Walker 1976: 553 ‘become dizzy from eating the bitter root’)] Pagoda tree (Sophora japonica), native to China and Korea and yielding a yellow dye; also called Chinese scholar tree.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

Japanese lantern plant

n. Bot. Var. J. lantern [E < J. + retransl. of J hōzuki ホオズキ(鬼灯、酸漿), poss. lit. attached soldier bug (), because this agricultural pest attaches itself to the plant] Chinese lantern plant (Physalis alkekengi), a perennial ground-cherry widely cultivated ornamentally for its brilliant calyxes, often used for decoration; also called winter cherry.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)