chopstick

n. (usu. pl. – Farrington 1615 as choppstickes) Food [Transl. of hashi, also later in Lafcadio Hearn’s “hashi (chopsticks)” (1894: 107) etc., though a major source beginning c.1699 was the pidgin E chopstick < chop fast (< dial. Chin cup – cf. chaku-, one of several Sino-J. readings of hashi, poss. < hayashi, obs. form of hayai quick – cf. sushi = sui; ult. translating Chin kuàizi, lit. the nimble/quick ones) + E stick; chopsticks replaced the traditional J. tableware of glass, silver, or ceramics during the Nara period] One of a pair of slender sticks used in Oriental countries (and in Western Oriental restaurants) to lift food to the mouth.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

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Chinese clover

n. (by 1909) Bot. [Loose transl. of genge ゲンゲ (a dial. word) or renge-sō レンゲソウ (written lit. as ‘lotus flower plant’ 蓮華草 < MChin) a milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus), prob. with influence and transl. of the sinicus portion of the technical name (see Ohwi 1965), imported from China] The Japanese and Chinese milk vetch, cultivated for forage and fertilizer for rice fields – cf. Japan clover.
Japan clover
n. Bot. Var. Jap(anese) clover [E < Japan (nec. because esp. ambig.) + transl. of J yahazu-sō (Lespedeza striata), alluding to its shape when the leaf is pulled or torn and thus is notched (ya-hazu < ya arrow + hazu notch) like the base of an arrowhead] clover, imported into the southeastern U.S. before 1846 and widely cultivated: Lespedeza.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

chaw(e)

(Farrington and O 1616) Drink (Obs.) [cha 茶 – dried, processed leaves of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis), believed to have originated in China and been brought to Japan in 1191 (< MChin = Chin ch’a); E cha was primarily transliterated < Chin, but was first found recorded in Cocks’s diary in Japan – see Warren 1993: 13] Cha (which has replaced chaw), as still found in British “a cuppa char”.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

byōbu

(1614) Household [Lit. barrier against the wind 屏風 (< MChin) – a folding screen, introduced from China in the 7th cent.] a screen usu. of six artistically painted panels, perhaps the most distinctive item of Japanese furniture; also called Japanese screen.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

bonze

n. Buddhism old var. [The earliest European form is Xavier’s L pl. Bonzii (1552), but the E. form is < F bonze (1570) < Pg bonzo < J bonsō (now bōzu) ordinary priest < MChin = Chin fān sēng (书中误作第二声), ult. < Skt] a Buddhist monk in East Asia.
bonzian
bonzery
bonzess
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)