Japanese lantern

n. Household Old U.S. var. magic lantern (Dare) [E < J. + transl. of J chōchin 提灯(ちょうちん) (< MChin), one of many kinds of J. lanterns, this one of paper with a candle inside, long hung outside houses or restaurants or carried for light in night processions] Chinese lantern, a collapsible one of thin colored paper.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

Traditional lighting equipment of Japan:
andon (行灯)
bonbori (雪洞)
chōchin (提灯)
tōrō (灯篭)
(Wikipedia)

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Japan

History, Ethnol. 2 old var. [Usu. said to be < MChin Jih-pun, lit. sun-rise (abbr. of Jih-pun-kuo 日本国, where kuo 国 = J -koku こく country), often found as the E. transl. of cognate J Nihon にほん, Nippon にっぽん; but Miller (1967: 11) quotes a J. report of c. A.D.870 that it was the J. who, disliking the Chinese name Uo 倭, invented the name Jih-pun] (Obs.) a native of Japan: Japanese; (transf.) an exceptionally hard varnish; an island constitutional monarchy off northeastern Asia. * has produced AJA ‘Americans of J. ancestry’ and Jap (derogatory), Japan-bashing and Japan Inc. (see cover of Time magazine of 21 Feb. 1994), and many derivations such as -ese, -esque, anti-, and non-. There are at least 188 recorded compounds like Japan(ese) cedar, almost all relating to a Japanese source and thus included in this corpus. Most, esp. botanical items like Japan clover, where the etymon yahazu-sō ヤハズソウ suggests the leaf shape, are folk compounds needing no initial Nihon for the Japanese common people, who considered the vegetation surrounding them as ordinary rather than particular. But English speakers needed an initial Japan(ese) to differentiate the Japanese variety from the unqualified clover etc., and thereupon evidently added the naturalized English Japan(ese). Such items are a kind of expanded translation, though not a calque like Japanese deer < Nihon-jika 日本鹿(にほんじか), so that almost all of the following 150+ items may be understood to have acquired their E Japan(ese) as the means of disambiguating their otherwise unparticularized form. See Davis and Knapp’s list of items composed of Japan(ese) XXX and their technical botanical names (1992: 95-97).
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

janken

Games [jan-ken(-pon) じゃんけん(ぽん) the scissors-paper-rock game, prob. brought from China] A game for two or more children, often to determine who is to be “it” in tag; used by adults in card games to decide who is to deal, serve in sports matches, etc. (cf. ken).
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

“That’s Beyond the Scope of This Paper”: Analyzing the Functions of a Familiar Phrase in Academic Writing

这句话在写东西时还挺好用哈哈!

Thonney, Teresa. (2012). “That’s Beyond the Scope of This Paper”: Analyzing the Functions of a Familiar Phrase in Academic Writing. Rhetoric Review: Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 309-326.

Source: “That’s Beyond the Scope of This Paper”: Analyzing the Functions of a Familiar Phrase in Academic Writing

Hotei

Buddhism [the pot-bellied god Hotei, lit. cloth bag (hō-tei 布袋, both < MChin), a Chinese deity who esp. cares for children and represents generosity among the seven gods 七福神] A cheerful god who carries a cloth bag with treatures that he bestows.
(Cannon, Garland. 1996. The Japanese Contributions to the English Language: An Historical Dictionary.)

Seven Lucky Gods or Seven Gods of Fortune 七福神(しちふくじん): Ebisu 恵比寿, Daikokuten 大黒天, Bishamonten 毘沙門天, Benzaiten 弁才天 or 弁財天, Fukurokuju 福禄寿, Jurōjin 寿老人, Hotei 布袋, and Kichijōten 吉祥天.
cf. 八仙(八福神)
(Wikipedia)